Pathogenic Distribution Characteristics of Acquired Pneumonia in Pediatric Children’s Community

  • Dong Wang
Keywords: Community Acquired Pneumonia, Pediatric Children, Pathogen Distribution

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to understand the pathogen spectrum and pathogenic characteristics of acquired
pneumonia (CAP) in hospitalized children’s community. December 2016 to December 2017 diagnosed as
retrospective collection of children acquired pneumonia, collect information about gender, age, pre-hospital
anti-pathogen treatment, admission time, and pathogen diagnosis. Analysis of pathogen composition and
epidemiological characteristics at different ages and seasons. The detection rate of pneumonia round body was
48.7%; the detection rate of mixed infection was 23.0%, and most common in bacterial combined virus infection.
The proportion of individual bacterial or viral infections decreases with age, the proportion of pneumonia round
body infection increased significantly. The proportion of mixed infections of multiple pathogens or no obvious
pathogens decreases with age; Pneumonia streptococcus infection is more common in infants under 3 years old
(75.9%).RSV infection is more common in infants (76.2%),ADV infection is more common in infants under 3
years old (82.2%).Single bacterial infections are most common in spring, followed by winter; single virus
infections are more common in winter; Single pneumonia infection is most common in autumn, followed by
summer; Mixed infections of multiple pathogens are more common in winter and spring; no clear pathogen
infection is highest in the spring. Pneumonia streptococcus infection is more common in winter and spring.
Influenza haemophilus infection is more common in spring, pneumonia klebsiella infection is more common in
winter and spring, RSV infection is more common in winter, ADV infection is more common in winter and spring.
The pathogen spectrum of CAP has significant distribution characteristics of age and seasonal .Bacterial and viral
infections are more common in infants. Bacterial infections are more common in winter and spring. Mixed
infections of multiple pathogens are more common in winter and spring.

Published
2019-09-15